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Blogs By Jackie Johnston

5 Tips for Reducing the Risk of a Lawsuit in Physician Practices

We know that physician practices can benefit tremendously by developing and following a proactive risk management program. Sound practices can improve patient safety, avoid lawsuits and ensure consistent regulatory compliance. Each practice is unique and therefore needs an individualized approach based on factors such as specialty type and patient profiles – but we have outlined  Continue Reading »

Top 5 Reasons Doctors Become “Non-Standard Physicians”

Non-standard physicians and surgeons are practicing doctors who have had claims frequency or severity issues, board actions or have been previously or are currently on probation. It can often be difficult for non-standard physicians to find affordable malpractice insurance coverage because they are considered a higher risk by insurance companies. Typically, a doctor remains in  Continue Reading »

5 ways doctors violate HIPAA regulations without knowing it

In the age of laptops, smart phones, social media, and text messaging, stringency around patient privacy must be a constant consideration for physicians. Here are the top five ways doctors violate HIPAA regulations without knowing it and steps they can take to decrease the occurrence of a HIPAA violation. #1: Texting patient information – We  Continue Reading »

5 Things to Know When Your Physician Client Needs Stand-Alone Tail Coverage

Maintaining seamless malpractice coverage is a critical issue for all physicians. The evolving health care industry with its consolidations, buyouts and changing delivery models continues to create a need for physicians and physician groups to purchase extended reporting period or “tail” coverage for their current medical malpractice policies. The explosion of hospitalist groups, locum tenens  Continue Reading »

5 Steps to Handling a Crisis Scenario in a Healthcare Facility

Imagine that you are a healthcare professional in charge of an outpatient clinic. A patient comes in for a routine procedure and the clinician performing the service was perceived to be invasive. The patient alleges that he or she was molested. What do you do first? Who do you call and how can you contain  Continue Reading »